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So far Dawn Johnson has created 33 blog entries.

H. R. 3219, Make America Secure Appropriations Act, 2018

This bill provides FY2018 appropriations for several federal agencies. The bill includes 4 of the 12 regular FY2018 appropriations bills, including: the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2018; the Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2018; the Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2018; and the Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2018. The bill also includes the Department of Homeland Security Border Infrastructure Construction Appropriations Act, 2018 which provides funding to U.S. Customs and Border Protection for the construction for fencing and a wall along the Southern Border.

Why Jason Lewis’ vote conflicts with our values.

“This package includes provisions that are harmful to water and ocean resources, cuts funding for clean energy innovation, undermines safe nuclear waste storage, and attacks border communities. Furthermore, this bill continues the House Leadership’s pattern of adding harmful policy riders into spending bills in an attempt to avoid regular order. Lastly, the inclusion of $1.6 billion for the continued construction of a failed, divisive, and anti- environmental wall along the southern border of the United States would be the latest example of inserting harmful, controversial and even radical policy proposals onto spending bills, which undermines the legislative process and the already complex budget process. This bill reflects a set of values that is not shared by the American people—one of clean air and clean water, one of equity and prosperity, one of safety and security.” (Source: Clean Water Action)

 

“In particular, H.R. 3219 includes a dangerous, undemocratic, poison-pill provision that would exempt the Von Clownstick administration’s repeal of the Clean Water Rule from requirements under the law. Section 108(a) reads as follows:
AUTHORIZATION.—The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Secretary of the Army may withdraw the Waters of the United States rule without regard to any provision of statute or regulation that establishes a requirement for such withdrawal.
This radical provision aims to shield the EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers’ repeal of protections for the drinking water of one in three people from public and legal scrutiny. For example, the agencies could ignore Clean Water Act and Administrative Procedure Act requirements that the repeal meaningfully consider public comment. It could also interfere with the courts’ ability to review if the withdrawal is “arbitrary or capricious.” The true motivation for this rider, therefore, is to cut out the public’s ability to have a voice in the actions of their government and to ensure that the Von Clownstick administration’s plan to allow polluters to dump into our waterways is incredibly difficult to challenge in court. It is hard to imagine a more undemocratic provision.” (Source: League of Conservation Voters)

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H. R. 3219, Make America Secure Appropriations Act, 2018 2017-11-10T00:20:05+00:00

H. J. 111, Providing for congressional disapproval of the rule submitted by Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection relating to “Arbitration Agreements”

BECAME LAW  This joint resolution nullifies a rule submitted by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) regarding arbitration agreements.

Why Jason Lewis’ vote conflicts with our values.

“This is a cynical effort to undermine consumer rights that were enhanced by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s arbitration agreement rule. Consumers should have access to class action lawsuits and the court system to resolve disputes with banks.” (Source: Countable)

ELECTIONS HAVE CONSEQUENCES. THIS RESOLUTION WAS SIGNED BY THE PRESIDENT ON 11/01/17.

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H. J. 111, Providing for congressional disapproval of the rule submitted by Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection relating to “Arbitration Agreements” 2018-03-08T09:07:01+00:00

H. R. 218, King Cove Road Land Exchange Act

This bill declares that, if the state of Alaska offers to convey to the Department of the Interior 43,093 acres of state-owned land, Interior shall convey to Alaska, in exchange, 206 acres of federal land within the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge and 131 acres of federal land within the Izembek Wilderness, for purposes of: (1) designating a road corridor through the refuge, and (2) constructing a single-lane gravel road along the road corridor.

Why Jason Lewis’ vote conflicts with our values.

“Alaska needs a “Road to Nowhere” like it needs another “Bridge to Nowhere.” I urge you to oppose this legislation, which is fiscally unjustifiable and a waste of federal tax dollars.” (Source: Council for Citizens Against Government Waste)

“Notably, H.R. 218 declares that the land transfer and road construction will not be a “major federal action” under the National Environmental Policy Act. The bill therefore exempts the project from environmental analysis, including the consideration of impacts, mitigation and alternatives. This exemption prevents the road from being potentially stalled or disapproved by the Department of the Interior through the NEPA process, as occurred when Congress previously approved the land exchange in 2009. After Congress approved the land exchange and road through the Omnibus Public Land Management Act that year, the Fish and Wildlife Service determined that the project was a major federal action and conducted an environmental impact statement to comply with NEPA. After this four-year analysis, the Interior Department determined that the road construction was not justified due to the harm it would cause to the surrounding wilderness. The House’s approval of the road last week and declaration that the road would not constitute a ‘major federal action’ effectively overrides the NEPA process that occurred after the 2009 approval of the process.” (Source: Legal Planet)

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H. R. 218, King Cove Road Land Exchange Act 2017-11-10T00:23:26+00:00

H. R. 2910, Promoting Interagency Coordination for Review of Natural Gas Pipelines Act

This bill expands the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to act as the lead agency for the purpose of coordinating all applicable federal authorizations and environmental reviews under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) with respect to authorizing a natural gas pipeline project under the Natural Gas Act.

Why Jason Lewis’ vote conflicts with our values.

“H.R. 2910 sacrifices public input and thorough environmental review in favor of giving the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) more power to fast-track approval of interstate natural gas pipelines. FERC has no accountability to the public or the environment, yet this bill would allow it to limit the participation and input of other state and federal agencies with relevant expertise in reviews required under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Additionally, H.R. 2910 would allow FERC to establish the scope of the environmental review and conditionally approve projects with incomplete environmental impact analysis, which could result in irreversible harm to our environment and public health. Given FERC’s history of rash approval of pipelines, H.R. 2910 is unnecessary, dangerous, and nothing more than a handout to the oil and gas industry at the expense of the health and safety of our communities.” (Source: League of Conservation Voters)

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H. R. 2910, Promoting Interagency Coordination for Review of Natural Gas Pipelines Act 2017-11-10T00:24:14+00:00

H. R. 2883, Promoting Cross-Border Energy Infrastructure Act

This bill prohibits any person from constructing, connecting, operating, or maintaining a border-crossing facility for the import or export of oil, natural gas, or electricity across an international border of the United States without obtaining a certificate of crossing. No presidential permit as required under specified executive orders shall be necessary for the construction, connection, operation, or maintenance of an oil or natural gas pipeline or electric transmission facility, including any border-crossing facility.

Why Jason Lewis’ vote conflicts with our values.

“H.R. 2883 would greenlight permitting of new, potentially harmful cross-border oil and gas pipelines and electric transmission lines without meaningful and thorough review and oversight. It eliminates many important longstanding procedures, undermining critical environmental and economic review by abolishing the requirement that a project obtain a presidential permit and be affirmatively determined to be in the public interest. H.R. 2883 also narrows the scope of environmental review under NEPA, exempting certain projects altogether and severely limiting the review of these massive, expensive, long-lasting infrastructure projects to only the section that crosses the border, ignoring the potential damaging impacts from the project as a whole. By only reviewing a small portion of these projects and essentially erasing the national interest requirement, this bill would make it almost impossible for an agency to ever deny a permit and could result in irreversible damage to our health, public safety, climate, environment, and economy.” (Source: League of Conservation Voters)

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H. R. 2883, Promoting Cross-Border Energy Infrastructure Act 2017-11-10T00:25:35+00:00

H. R. 806, Ozone Standards Implementation Act of 2017

This bill amends the Clean Air Act (CAA) to revise the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) program.

Why Jason Lewis’ vote conflicts with our values.

“Despite its name, the legislation would actually systematically weaken the Clean Air Act without a single improvement, undermine Americans’ 46-year right to healthy air based on medical science, and delay life-saving health standards already years overdue..” (Source: League of Women Voters)

“The legislation would systematically weaken the Clean Air Act and delay life-saving health standards that are already years overdue.” (Source: National Resources Defense Council)

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H. R. 806, Ozone Standards Implementation Act of 2017 2017-11-10T00:26:41+00:00

H. R. 23, Gaining Responsibility on Water Act of 2017

This bill requires the Central Valley Project (CVP) and the State Water Project in California to be operated pursuant to the water quality standards and operational constraints described in the “Principles for Agreement on the Bay-Delta Standards Between the State of California and the Federal Government” dated December 15, 1994.

Why Jason Lewis’ vote conflicts with our values.

“H.R. 23 exposes the hypocrisy of House Republicans, who frequently advocate for states’ rights and, conversely, against increased federal authority. But principles of state sovereignty are baldly cast aside by the proponents of H.R. 23 when those principles protect environmental values that limit water deliveries to thirsty agricultural interests in California’s Central Valley. Such “one-way federalism” should be exposed for what it is–a cynical effort to degrade California’s environment in order to accommodate well-heeled water interests.” (Source: Legal Planet)

“This bill would prevent California from managing its own rivers, fisheries, and public trust resources – even going so far as to specifically prohibit the application of the Endangered Species Act and Public Trust Doctrine in restricting water rights or diversions associated with the State Water Project (SWP) or Central Valley Project (CVP).” (Source:  Friends of the Eel River)

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H. R. 23, Gaining Responsibility on Water Act of 2017 2017-11-10T00:27:16+00:00

H. R. 3004, Kate’s Law

This bill amends the Immigration and Nationality Act to revise provisions relating to the reentry of removed aliens.

Why Jason Lewis’ vote conflicts with our values.

“While it is nominally an “immigration” bill, its principal aim relates to criminal justice—namely, an increase in the maximum sentences for immigrants who reenter the country illegally after a deportation. The bill is a waste of federal resources. It would likely balloon America’s population of nonviolent prisoners, while not protecting Americans against serious criminals.” (Source: Cato Institute)

“Increasing prison terms for people who illegally re-enter the country will only keep U.S. prisons full and cost taxpayers more money to keep repeat offenders incarcerated.” (Source: Countable)

“It goes without saying that anyone who commits heinous crimes must be brought to justice. Unfortunately, these misguided bills are blatant attacks on our immigrant communities. By imposing unnecessary sentences on people who pose no threat to our communities, H.R. 3004 wastes our taxpayer dollars while H.R. 3003 will only serve to hinder our local law enforcement from protecting those they serve from crime and violence.
“Our southern Minnesota communities, leaders and law enforcement officials understand that building and strengthening relationships between local police and the people they serve is critical to public safety. Instead of trying to hold federal funding for state and local governments hostage and demonize those in genuine search of a better life for their families in the United States, Republicans should be working with Democrats to advance comprehensive immigration reform that will strengthen our economy and our country.” (Source: Tim Walz, US Congressman, MN 1st Congressional District)

More Info See Bill

 

H. R. 3004, Kate’s Law 2017-11-10T00:27:39+00:00

H. R. 3003, No Sanctuary for Criminals Act

This bill amends the Immigration and Nationality Act to prohibit any federal, state, or local government or any individual from prohibiting any government entity, official, or employee from complying with the immigration laws or cooperating with federal law enforcement of such laws.

Why Jason Lewis’ vote conflicts with our values.

“The federal government should give states law enforcement grants and let them set their own priorities. Conditioning grants on the enforcement of immigration law may be unconstitutional.” (Source: Countable)

“It would jeopardize public safety by withholding critical public safety funding from jurisdictions that tell their police officers not to ask an individual their immigration status. Many departments have such policies to encourage crime victims and witnesses to report crimes and to build trust with immigrant communities.” (Source: The United States Conference of Mayors)

“It goes without saying that anyone who commits heinous crimes must be brought to justice. Unfortunately, these misguided bills are blatant attacks on our immigrant communities. By imposing unnecessary sentences on people who pose no threat to our communities, H.R. 3004 wastes our taxpayer dollars while H.R. 3003 will only serve to hinder our local law enforcement from protecting those they serve from crime and violence.
“Our southern Minnesota communities, leaders and law enforcement officials understand that building and strengthening relationships between local police and the people they serve is critical to public safety. Instead of trying to hold federal funding for state and local governments hostage and demonize those in genuine search of a better life for their families in the United States, Republicans should be working with Democrats to advance comprehensive immigration reform that will strengthen our economy and our country.”  (Source:  Tim Walz, US Congressman, MN 1st Congressional District)

More Info See Bill

 

H. R. 3003, No Sanctuary for Criminals Act 2017-11-10T00:28:08+00:00

H. R. 1215, Protecting Access to Care Act of 2017

This bill establishes provisions governing health care lawsuits where coverage for the care was provided or subsidized by the federal government, including through a subsidy or tax benefit.

Why Jason Lewis’ vote conflicts with our values.

“This bill would limit the legal rights of injured patients and families of those killed by negligent health care. The bill’s sweeping scope covers not only cases involving medical malpractice, but also cases involving unsafe drugs and nursing home abuse and neglect.” (Source: Center for Justice & Democracy)

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H. R. 1215, Protecting Access to Care Act of 2017 2017-11-10T00:28:36+00:00